Upcoming Event Features: Earth and the Environment

screen-shot-2016-10-11-at-11-51-58-amB3 Home: Bats, Bees, and Birds
Saturday, November 5, 10am—1pm
Garfield Park Arts Center
2432 Conservatory Dr.
IndyGo: 13 & 22
FREE
317-916-7832 / srobertson99@ivytech.edu.

Presented by Ivy Tech Community College, Garfield Park Arts Center, Arts for Learning Indiana, and Social Sketch Indy

Family-friendly event where participants build and decorate houses for bats, bees, and birds while learning about the importance of these tiny creatures on our ecosystem.

Home is more than just for humans. Our animal, mammal, and insect companions on earth deserve to have their lives respected and researched. With a decrease in “homes” for bats, bees, and birds, our ecosystems and food supplies will dwindle. We need them for our global community!

This family-friendly, all-ages event allows attendees to create art about bats, bees, and birds with teaching artists from ARTFORCE Art Camp and Social Sketch Indy. Everyone will be able to enjoy a community-created exhibition about bats, bees, and birds, art-making activities, educational programming, takeaways from conservation organizations—even beekeepers!, and food and drink (for purchase) by Ivy Tech culinary, Bee Coffee Roasters, and New Day Meadery.

While supplies last, approximately 90 family units will be able to build bat, bird, or bee house with students and faculty from Ivy Tech’s Construction Technology program.

Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

 

screen-shot-2016-10-11-at-11-51-50-am

My Home, My Earth, My Responsibility
Wednesday, November 9, 6:30—8:30pm
Unitarian Universalist Church of Indianapolis
615 W. 43rd St.
Indy Go: 18 or 28
FREE
317-278-2444 / sacademy@iupui.edu

Presented by Senior Academy of IUPUI, Cedar Street Builders, Eagle Creek Park Foundation, Hoosier Environmental Council, Indianapolis Hiking Club, and Unitarian Universalist Church of Indianapolis

Through exhibits, conversations, and short multi-media presentations, experts in the fields of architecture, aging, and the environment will explore how our choices can help preserve our common home, Earth, for future generations.

Our homes, whether personal residences or the Earth, are interconnected in complex, diverse, fragile, and transient ways. This event explores that intersection by inviting experts from a variety of backgrounds to address the question, “How do we best understand, preserve, and utilize our HOME?” Through a fast-paced, multi-media format utilizing art displays, exhibits, guest presenters, and images this presentation will take participants on a sensory and intellectual journey that begins and ends at “home,” prompting all to consider how to answer the challenge.

The reception area containing art, information, and displays, will open at 6:30pm with presentations beginning at 7pm. Each presentation (6 total) will last 7 to 10 minutes, keeping the evening’s energy vibrant and engaged. Presenters will answer audience questions at the end.

Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

screen-shot-2016-10-11-at-11-52-18-amThere’s No Place Like Home: Love Letters to Planet Earth
Saturday, November 12, 1—3:30pm
Orchard School
615 W. 64th St.
IndyGo: 28
FREE
317-835-9827 / jimpoyser@earthcharterindiana.org

Presented by Elders Climate Action, The Orchard School, The Nature Conservancy, and Youth Power Indiana

Youth and elders come together to learn from each other and explore the different ways we share and care for our home, planet earth.

Dorothy knew the truth: “There’s no place like home.” Since planet earth is our only home, how we treat it matters. We are more than mere sojourners passing through without consequence. Our choices about the earth affect our lives, our children’s lives, and grandchildren’s lives. Let’s work across generational lines to be the best stewards of the earth we can be!

This intergenerational event invites you to learn from today’s youth as well as from the wisdom of elders. Third grade students from The Orchard School as well as other area schools will kick off the gathering by reading love letters to the earth. Older students will then present on climate education topics such as Climate Recovery.  (They’ll also be happy to swap stories on how they have achieved policy victories in IPS!) Afterwards, older attendees will be invited to write their own love and action letters while youth learn about the new Children of Indiana Nature Park. When the two groups recommence, some of the elders will read their love letters to the next generation.

This event gives a voice to the young and energizes elders to exercise their power to protect and preserve. United, these generations can teach and learn from each other.  Begin with love, and anything is possible.

Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

screen-shot-2016-10-11-at-11-52-33-amDo It Again Recycled Art Market: Home is What We Make of It
Saturday, November. 5, 10am—3pm
SullivanMunce Cultural Center
225 W. Hawthorne St., Zionsville
IndyGo: 86
FREE
317-873-4900 / cynthiayoung@sullivanmunce.org

Presented by Zionsville Cultural District, SullivanMunce Cultural Center, Boone County Solid Waste Management District, Zion Nature Center, and Zionsville Street and Stormwater Department.

Fun, come-and-go, interactive, educational art & community fair focusing on conservation and preservation of our planet’s natural resources through art made of recycled and repurposed materials.

The annual Do It Again Recycled Art Market offers an opportunity to understand the affect one person can have on our shared home—planet Earth! We will not only demonstrate how “home” is what we make of it, but how you can make art from your home.

During the day, you can . . . learn facts about the effect of trash on our environment, pick up tips for conserving natural resources, make art out of old household “junk,” exchange (10) plastic bags for a reusable shopping bag, participate in an “up-cycle” demonstration by Five Thirty Home—a local antique/repurpose shop—, bid on rain barrels painted by local artists, and peruse artist booths featuring goods made of reclaimed, reused, and recycled materials. Representatives from Cedar Street Builders will also provide information and touchable examples of the building materials needed to construct “passive homes,” which are ultra-low energy consuming buildings.

Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

 

 

Guest Post: At Home Everywhere on Earth

By Carol Johnston Carol.Johnston

CTS Director of Lifelong Theological Education

A few years ago I met an African American boy who had lived in a high-crime neighborhood all his life and whose home was hardly less chaotic than the streets. He was participating in a meeting at a large wealthy church where almost everyone present was white. A place far from his own “home.”  Yet, though in an alien place surrounded by white strangers, he was completely unintimidated.  He spoke without hesitation and asked some of the most insightful questions of anyone at the meeting.

This young man had been mentored at the Kheprw Institute where he had experienced a sense of “home” that was about being seen for the gifted human being he is. He had been encouraged to develop and share his gifts. He’d also been taught to view the earth as his home—a place to be embraced and cared for. As a consequence, he carried a sense of “home” inside him and could be “at home” wherever he went.

From a faith perspective, I would assert that this young man has been nurtured in a healthy spirituality—one that had helped him realize wherever he lives, it is infused with a divine presence and care that can be accessed.

When this experience of home is present, you discover divine care is present everywhere. Wherever life takes you, you can carry the sense of security of home inside you.

Most faith traditions affirm that the whole of creation is home because the world and everything in it, including each of us, is infused with the loving care of the Creator. As the poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning puts it, “Earth is crammed with heaven, and every common bush afire with God.”

This is the reason people of every faith are trying to wake us up to the danger of environmental destruction, especially climate change. We believe that the Earth is our home, and that it is imperative for the sake of all life to care for it.

We are working to help shift ways of life that work against nature’s creativity and endanger all life to ways of life that learn from the divine wisdom embedded in nature and work with it for the benefit of all. My Christian faith affirms that the whole Earth is the sacred realm of divine creativity and love, and that we are all loved, gifted, and interrelated in this web of life.

Whenever and wherever any of us can experience this love and affirmation of our gifts, and affirm the same for others, we are doing the work of creating home for each other. This fThen we can be at home everywhere, and join in the work of healing and repairing “this fragile earth, our island home,” as an Episcopal prayer puts it.