Why one man is learning to drive again

photo (3)By Debra Des Vignes

For several years Tyrone C. was homeless and struggled to keep a job and find a place to stay. He felt alone and overwhelmed. Take a look at how one homeless veteran’s journey might look like.

Tyrone’s part-time job ended and he did not know where his next paycheck would come from. With his daughter in Indianapolis, he traveled by bus to stay with her and they looked for help, a place for a homeless veteran to stay. On his third day in Indianapolis he heard about the Hoosier Veterans Assistance Foundation (HVAF). From the moment a veteran enters HVAF’s housing, the goal is to help him or her regain stability and take back their life. The following day Tyrone spoke to a case manager and was provided supportive housing at HVAF’s Moreau property. At Tyrone’s request, his case manager connected him with one of HVAF’s partners, the Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic for legal help.

“The 53-year-old Marine Corps veteran couldn’t get behind the wheel.”

From the street.

Once housed, Tyrone had a barrier he faced that limited his mobility. His driving privileges had been indefinitely suspended since 1999. In fact, he was on a lifetime habitual traffic violator (HTV) status. The 53-year-old Marine Corps veteran couldn’t get behind the wheel.

The Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic represented Tyrone in successfully petitioning the Marion Circuit Court for a probationary, restricted license which allows him to drive to and from work, medical appointments, and rehabilitation programs. Although this type of license comes with significant restrictions, Tyrone learned in September that he will receive full driving privileges back in three years (which would be for the first time in 18 years!). He currently has probationary driving privileges, so he can drive to work and medical appointments once he has a vehicle.

Someone to turn to.

“It’s overwhelming, the outpouring of support. I get emotional sometimes because I definitely needed the help,” says Tyrone.

NCLC also represented Tyrone in seeking an expungement of his prior convictions. Although it has been moer than 15 years since his last conviction, a record can still present obstacles to getting a better job. This process will improve Tyrone’s prospects because it removes low-level convictions from the public record.

Tyrone has a lot to look forward to. He moves into his own one-bedroom apartment next month and is excited about driving again soon as well as having a clean record and a fresh start.

He says his life intersected with organizations and resources that made a difference and the results will last a lifetime. There’s no greater example than Tyrone to show us that along life’s journey, second chances remain within reach.

 

Debra Des Vignes is Vice President of Marketing, Communication and Public Relations at HVAF of Indiana.

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