Central Indiana’s work commute origins

guest blog by Jennifer Gebhard, Program Manager, CIRTA/Commuter Connect

If you look at Central Indiana commuting over time, you’ll find that a lot of our choices for getting to work have been reactions to events and conditions surrounding us … war, for example, or economic upheaval.

Now we find ourselves making another set of adjustments based on outside factors. But maybe, once this current global upheaval passes, we can be proactive about commuting rather than reactive.

In the early 20th Century, most central Indiana residents traveled to work by walking, riding a streetcar or taking the interurban, a railway system that connected Indianapolis with outlying communities statewide. The tracks on which the streetcars and interurbans operated were pulled up and paved over decades ago, but we still see remnants of them today.

Streets on the Southside are named for numbered stops along the interurban line that ran down Madison Avenue: Stop 10, Stop 11, Stop 12 and Stop 13. And the clusters of businesses at intersections along College Avenue are there because of the streetcars that once ran north and south along that route. Think Broad Ripple Avenue, Kessler Ave., 54th and 52nd streets.

As car ownership became more popular in the following decades, interurban routes and streetcars were abandoned. Throughout the 1930s, electric rail lines abandoned. The last interurban car left Traction Terminal in downtown Indianapolis in 1941.

A few years later, carpooling became prominent, as the federal government promoted it as a rubber- and fuel-rationing strategy during World War II. War-time posters used several angles to promote carpools, including the hyperbolic, “When you ride ALONE, you ride with Hitler” headline.

When the war was over, and American manufacturing shifted from producing war-related items to consumer goods, we responded by returning to our own cars. In 1950, America produced more than 8 million cars; by 1958, there were more than 67 million cars registered in the United States, more than twice the number at the start of the decade. By 1959, Henry Ford’s goal of 30 years earlier – that any man with a good job should be able to afford a car – was achieved. In the following years, we responded to the development of the national highway interstate system by commuting longer distances, often alone.

And then the energy crisis of the 1970s sent us scrambling back into carpools, trying to conserve fuel and reduce the pain of skyrocketing gas prices. According to the Census Bureau, by 1980, roughly 23.5% of Americans were carpooling … but then gas prices fell, disposable incomes rose and government support of alternative commuting options evaporated. By 2011, the carpool rate had fallen to 11%.

Now we face a new influence on commuting patterns: COVID-19, which, for many of us, has essentially brought commuting to a halt as we work from home thanks to internet connectivity. Telecommuting has become our primary form of commuting. So, once again, our commuting habits have been shaped by outside forces.

But maybe it’s time for all of us proactively choose the best commuting option rather than submitting to the conditions. Obviously, we at Commuter Connect encourage people to choose to get to work in ways that don’t involve each of us driving separately in our own cars. And we’re working to make that easier.

These days we promote carpooling in Central Indiana by making it easier with technology. The Central Indiana Regional Transportation Authority (CIRTA) offers several commuting supports including the Commuter Connect website, which provides free accounts to upload your commute information and find carpool matches, bus and connector routes, bike-riding buddies and other means to share the ride to work. It also allows you to track “green commutes” to measure the money you save and emissions you reduce.

So, let’s spend this time when we’re essentially not commuting to plan for the day when we start commuting again. Let’s look forward to spending more time with people by commuting together. And let’s make the next milestone in our commuting history one that contributes to cleaner air, easier commutes and a stronger sense of community.

Prepare for the return to public interaction by signing up for a Commuter Connect account and planning for commuting partners for when the crisis lifts. Share the ride and return to a “new normal” that’s even better than the old one.

 

Sharks and Butterflies

By Chris L.

The analogy of the menacing and the majestic is a common theme throughout the observation of nature – be it human or animal kingdom. A convicted felon is labeled as a “menace to society,” but a butterfly can also be a prisoner, when trapped inside a caterpillar.

The allegory of a cell being a cocoon of evolution can easily get overlooked – especially when popular thought is to keep a shiv sharp…or get shiv’d by a shiver of sharks. A room full of incarcerated men were asked if they’d rather be a shark or a butterfly. These hardened criminals reacted in a mini uproar of tangible sighs, razzberries, and dismissive hand waves with disdain and disbelief that they were even asked such a preposterous question.

Their collective mind fixated on the thin fin cutting thru the water – and that extra row of teeth revealing itself when they’re about to sink into the flesh of their prey. It was unanimous that the guys saw themselves as sharks. It was then explained that those big fish go stir crazy after they’ve been in confinement, and they can’t even swim straight upon release.

Butterflies on the other hand…they are better for their confinement. They went into it as crawling caterpillars and came out with wings and flying colors. The activity within a chrysalis is a programmed mix of destruction and growth. Some cells die, and body parts atrophy. The same is true for a cellhouse in the penitentiary.

Nevertheless, there are certain cells in this majestic creature in the making – as well as the rare diamond in the rough residing in a cell – that have been in place since birth, ready to rapidly expand.

The butterfly reveals itself as completely transformed, with the ability to fly over the limitations of its past. Setting its own standard for newfound freedom.

Powerful storytelling events included in 2019 Festival

The 2019 Spirit & Place Festival will celebrate, explore, challenge and reflect on the meaning behind revolution and evolution, creating the unique theme of R/Evolution on Nov. 1-10. Exploring the idea of change in the world, whether it’s sudden and abrupt, or gradual and unfolding, this year’s festival offers the public a chance to share in experiences that build community.

Now in its 24th year, the Spirit & Place Festival continues to be Indianapolis’ largest collaborative festival that uses the arts, religion and humanities as tools for shaping individual and community life through 10 days of events designed with community partners, individuals and congregations.

There will be 32 unique events this year that will take place across Indianapolis and feature a variety of presenters, speakers and performers. This year’s festival includes many events centered around panel-style discussions over powerful topics. These discussions are intended to spark conversation and explore current and historical events that are relevant to citizens of Central Indiana.

Visit the website at www.spiritandplace.org for the full festival lineup, including these interactive events below:

EVENT INFO:

 Saturday, November 2, 9 a.m.—2 p.m.

 Spirited Chase

Presented by WFYI Public Media and its Mystery Partners

WFYI Public Media—1630 N. Meridian St.

Cost: $9

 Spirited Chase is a unique event offering participants the opportunity to renew their spirit through discovering new people and places in our community. Each mystery partner organization has been selected based on their connection to the transformation of our city and the individuals who live in it. At each mystery destination, participants will engage in a brief interactive program as they learn about the many ways these people, places, and programs are affecting change and transforming, evolving, and revolutionizing our community.  

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Saturday, November 2, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Super Universal Shape Shifters

Presented by Ivy Tech Community College – Indianapolis, Ivy Tech Student Life & Development Indianapolis, and Dances of Universal Peace Indianapolis

Ivy Tech Community College IFC Illinois Fall Creek Center—2535 N. Capitol Ave.

 Join us for a come-and-go, family-friendly community event that will stoke positive energy in the universe! Bring your love of music and dance to create sacred symbols of the universe. 

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Sunday, November 3, 12 p.m. — Sunday, November 10, 6 p.m.

 ArtTroop: Transformance

Presented by the Indianapolis Art Center and local artist-veterans

Indianapolis Art Center—820 E. 67th St.

View works of art that express the evolution, change, and growth of local artist/veterans.

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 Sunday, November 3, 1—4 p.m.

 Restorations & Requiems: Finding Strength through Music, Art & Faith
Presented by Central Christian Church and Allisonville Christian Church

Central Christian Church Sanctuary & Fellowship Hall—701 N. Delaware St.

Explore how art and music can help heal the soul through a performance of John Rutter’s Requiem, a visual art show, and a discussion panel. 
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 Monday, November 4, 6:30—8:00 p.m.

 Remember 1968: Society, Higher Education, and Activism

Presented by IUPUI School of Education, IUPUI Africana Studies Program and Olaniyan Scholars Program, IUPUI Museum Studies Program, and Center for Black Literature & Culture

Central Library Center for Black Literature and Culture—40 E. St. Clair St.

 Life Magazine referenced 1968 as “the year that changed the world.” Hear from Dr. Jakobi Williams at this opening night reception for the exhibit “Remember 1968” to learn how college students shaped this revolutionary year and how campuses across the nation continue to grapple with its legacy. 
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 Monday, November 4, 7:30 – 9:00 p.m.

 Antisemitism: The Evolution of the Longest Hatred

Presented by Congregation Beth-El Zedeck and the Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library

Congregation Beth-El Zedeck—600 W. 70th St.

 Historian Deborah Lipstadt, an internationally-renowned expert on the Holocaust, will address the evolution of antisemitism as a paradigm for other forms of bigotry and hate.

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 Tuesday, November 5, 6—8 p.m.

A Faith Leader & a Scientist Walk into a Bar: Using Improv to Talk about Science and Faith

Presented by IUPUI/IU School of Medicine Communicating Science Program; The daVinci Pursuit; Center for Interfaith Cooperation; March for Science Indiana; and IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society.

Books & Brews South Indy—3808 S. Shelby St.

Let’s talk science and religion over coffee or a beer! Using theatrical improvisation techniques, you’ll be given the chance to take on the persona of a scientist, faith leader, or “everyday person” and then practice empathy-rooted communication strategies.

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Wednesday, November 6, 5:30—8:00 p.m.

 Stuck

Presented by the Indianapolis Film Project, Spades Park Branch Library, Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library, Big Car Collaborative, and Bluebeard Restaurant

Spades Park Library—1801 Nowland Ave.

 An evening of conversation and film. Join local authors and artists to discuss how evolving threats and fears of the “other” affect art, culture, and community and watch the 1956 film “Storm Center” starring Bette Davis. Food by Bluebeard!

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Wednesday, November 6, 6:30—8:30 p.m.

 The Power of the Page

Presented by Peace and Justice Studies at Marian University, Art & Design at Marian University, Marian University Writing Center

Marian University Allison Mansion—3200 Cold Spring Rd.

 View and learn about how the St. John’s Bible – the first fully illuminated and hand-written Bible created since the Middle Ages—uses its power to shift focus towards women, social justice, and contemporary issues.
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Wednesday, November 6, 7—9p.m.

 Backs Against the Wall: A Film Screening & Discussion on the Howard Thurman Story

Presented by the Center for Interfaith Cooperation and Butler University Center for Faith and Vocation. Part of the New View Film Series.

Edison-Duckwall Recital Hall—4600 Sunset Blvd.

 Join in on a documentary film screening of “Backs Against the Wall: The Howard Thurman Story” followed by a riveting discussion and multi-art performance inspired by this influential theologian, poet, mystic, and philosopher of nonviolence.

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Thursday, November 7, 6—8pm

 Cey More with Art: Art in Cultural R/Evolution

Presented by The Indianapolis Public Library and The Kheprw Institute’s art and cultural assembly, The Build

___________________________________________________

Central Library Auditorium—40 E. St. Clair St.

 Hear from hip-hop legend Cey Adams, creative director of Def Jam Recordings, and local artists on the revolutionary power of art. Music, art work, and other creative expressions will be showcased throughout the evening.

 Thursday, November 7, 7:00—8:30 p.m.

 The Smart Justice Revolution: From Retribution to Rehabilitation and Reintegration

Presented by the ACLU of Indiana, Goodwill – New Beginnings, Newfields, and Public Advocates in Community Reentry (PACE) Indy

Newfields The Toby Theater—4000 N. Michigan Rd.

 Confront the growing need for a revolution in the criminal justice system –a system that has evolved to focus on punishment rather than rehabilitation. Art exhibition and panel discussion featuring criminal justice policy experts, prison ministry workers, and individuals affected by the prison system.  
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Thursday, November 7, 7:00—8:30 p.m.

 The Art of Boycott: Speech, Resistance, and Revolution

Presented by American Friends Service Committee, Muslim Youth Collective, VOCAB, Garfield Park Arts Center, and Jewish Voice for Peace – Indiana

Garfield Park Arts Center—2432 Conservatory Dr.

 An exhibition and panel discussion exploring the art, theory, and practice of boycott: how small changes in behavior can drive systemic change and achieve justice.

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Saturday, November 9, 1:00—4:00 p.m.

 Herstory: A Prenatal-Postpartum Pop-Up Museum

Presented by IU Fairbanks School of Public Health, Grassroots Maternal and Child Health Leaders, Carriage House East Apartments – A Glick Property, and IUPUI Department of English

Carriage House Apartments East Community Center—10174 Tinton Ct.

 Celebrate and create with grassroots leaders in maternal and child health as they create pop-up museum aimed to educate on community efforts to improve birth outcomes. This event honors the vital relationship between healthy communities and healthy pregnancies

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 Saturday, November 9, 6:30—8:00 p.m.

 Solutions & S’mores

Presented by Bellfound Farm and Project Lia

Bellfound Farm Marketplace—2856 S. Meridian St.

 Film screening highlighting the stories of women who have experienced incarceration, followed by small group discussions hosted over s’mores!

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Sunday, November 10, 2—4 p.m.

The World We Live(d) In

Presented by JCC Indianapolis, Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council, Dance Kaleidoscope, Indiana Writers Center, and Indianapolis Art Center

JCC Indianapolis—6701 Hoover Rd.

A juxtaposition of social the justice climate of yesterday and today interpreted through poetry and dance.

Music and theater events part of 2019 Festival

The 2019 Spirit & Place Festival will celebrate, explore, challenge and reflect on the meaning behind revolution and evolution, creating the unique theme of R/Evolution on Nov. 1-10. Exploring the idea of change in the world, whether it’s sudden and abrupt, or gradual and unfolding, this year’s festival offers the public a chance to share in experiences that build community.

Now in its 24th year, the Spirit & Place Festival continues to be Indianapolis’ largest collaborative festival that uses the arts, religion and humanities as tools for shaping individual and community life through 10 days of events designed with community partners, individuals and congregations.

There will be 32 unique events this year that will take place across Indianapolis and feature a variety of presenters, speakers and performers. This year’s festival includes many events centered around panel-style discussions over powerful topics. These discussions are intended to spark conversation and explore current and historical events that are relevant to citizens of Central Indiana.

Visit the website at www.spiritandplace.org for the full festival lineup, including these music and theater events below:

EVENT INFO:

 Saturday, November 2, 6—9 p.m.

 Songs of Revolution

Presented by All317HipHop, Indy Justice Choir, and The Church Within

The Church Within—1125 Spruce St.

Music and revolution have a long history together. Join us as we sing together to explore this history and examine how “songs of revolution” have changed over time. Featured artists and presenters include Indy Justice Choir, Gangsters, Edison School for the Arts, Douglas Peach, and Geechee Gullah Ring Shouters (via video).

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 Sunday, November 3, 1—4 p.m.

 Restorations & Requiems: Finding Strength through Music, Art & Faith
Presented by Central Christian Church and Allisonville Christian Church

Central Christian Church Sanctuary & Fellowship Hall—701 N. Delaware St.

Explore how art and music can help heal the soul through a performance of John Rutter’s Requiem, a visual art show, and a discussion panel. 

___________________________________________________

 Sunday, November 3, 2 – 4 p.m.

 A Violist’s Trousseau

Presented by musician Colette Abel, Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, Butler University Jordan College of Arts, Encore Orchestral Strings, and Indianapolis Violin

Edison-Duckwall Recital Hall—4600 Sunset Blvd.

 In a program spanning the era of classical music from the baroque to the present, Colette Abel explores the evolution and revolution of the viola and viola d’amore through the music of Vivaldi, Schubert, Paganini, and Richard Auldon Clark.

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Tuesday, November 5, 6—8 p.m.

A Faith Leader & a Scientist Walk into a Bar: Using Improv to Talk about Science and Faith

Presented by IUPUI/IU School of Medicine Communicating Science Program; The daVinci Pursuit; Center for Interfaith Cooperation; March for Science Indiana; and IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society.

Books & Brews South Indy—3808 S. Shelby St.

Let’s talk science and religion over coffee or a beer! Using theatrical improvisation techniques, you’ll be given the chance to take on the persona of a scientist, faith leader, or “everyday person” and then practice empathy-rooted communication strategies.

___________________________________________________

 Thursday, November 7, 6—8pm

 Cey More with Art: Art in Cultural R/Evolution

Presented by The Indianapolis Public Library and The Kheprw Institute’s art and cultural assembly, The Build

Central Library Auditorium—40 E. St. Clair St.

 Hear from hip-hop legend Cey Adams, creative director of Def Jam Recordings, and local artists on the revolutionary power of art. Music, art work, and other creative expressions will be showcased throughout the evening.

___________________________________________________

 Sunday, November 10, 2—4 p.m.

The World We Live(d) In

Presented by JCC Indianapolis, Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council, Dance Kaleidoscope, Indiana Writers Center, and Indianapolis Art Center

JCC Indianapolis—6701 Hoover Rd.

A juxtaposition of the social justice climate of yesterday and today interpreted through poetry and dance.

Family-fun events part of 2019 Festival

The 2019 Spirit & Place Festival will celebrate, explore, challenge and reflect on the meaning behind revolution and evolution, creating the unique theme of R/Evolution on Nov. 1-10. Exploring the idea of change in the world, whether it’s sudden and abrupt or gradual and unfolding, this year’s festival offers the public a chance to share in experiences that build community.

Now in its 24th year, the Spirit & Place Festival continues to be Indianapolis’ largest collaborative festival that uses the arts, religion and humanities as tools for shaping individual and community life through 10 days of events designed with community partners, individuals and congregations.

There will be 32 unique events this year that will take place across Indianapolis and feature a variety of presenters, speakers and performers. This year’s festival includes many events centered around panel-style discussions over powerful topics. These discussions are intended to spark conversation and explore current and historical events that are relevant to citizens of Central Indiana.

Visit the website at www.spiritandplace.org for the full festival lineup, including these family-fun events below:

EVENT INFO:

 Friday, November 1, 6 – 9 p.m.

 Spirit & Place Festival Opening Night

Friday, Nov. 1, 6-9 p.m.

Harrison Center

1505 N. Delaware St.

FREE

After-Party!

Friday, Nov. 1, 9-11 p.m.

McGowan Hall

1305 N. Delaware St.

FREE

 Soak in some local art and enjoy First Friday with us at the Harrison Center. Check out a new exhibit by Kyle Ragsdale, grab something to eat at a food truck or a beer from Sun King, and participate in other fun activities! Afterwards, head down the street to McGowan Hall for a Spirit & Place after-party featuring live music, local art and a cash bar.

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 Saturday, November 2, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Super Universal Shape Shifters

Presented by Ivy Tech Community College – Indianapolis, Ivy Tech Student Life & Development Indianapolis, and Dances of Universal Peace Indianapolis

Ivy Tech Community College IFC Illinois Fall Creek Center—2535 N. Capitol Ave.

 Join us for a come-and-go, family-friendly community event that will stoke positive energy in the universe! Bring your love of music and dance to create sacred symbols of the universe.

Discussion events included in 2019 Festival

The 2019 Spirit & Place Festival will celebrate, explore, challenge and reflect on the meaning behind revolution and evolution, creating the unique theme of R/Evolution on Nov. 1-10. Exploring the idea of change in the world, whether it’s sudden and abrupt, or gradual and unfolding, this year’s festival offers the public a chance to share in experiences that build community.

Now in its 24th year, the Spirit & Place Festival continues to be Indianapolis’ largest collaborative festival that uses the arts, religion and humanities as tools for shaping individual and community life through 10 days of events designed with community partners, individuals and congregations.

There will be 32 unique events this year that will take place across Indianapolis and feature a variety of presenters, speakers and performers. This year’s festival includes many events centered around panel-style discussions over powerful topics. These discussions are intended to spark conversation and explore current and historical events that are relevant to citizens of Central Indiana.

Visit the website at www.spiritandplace.org for the full festival lineup, including these discussion events below:

EVENT INFO:

 Sunday, November 3, 1:30—3:00 p.m.

 We Need to Have this Conversation. Period.

Presented by Indiana Historical Society, Indiana Medical History Museum, Indiana State Department of Health – Office of Women’s Health, LifeSmart Youth, Dr. Sharra Vostral, and Women4Change Indiana

Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center—450 W. Ohio Street

Cycles. They are a fact of life, yet too taboo to talk about. Go public with your period for a conversation about adventures in menstruation.

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 Sunday, November 3, 2—4 p.m. 

 A Tailored Fit: Three Conversations on Fitting In featuring Dr. Maria Hamilton Abegunde (#1)

Presented by the IU Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies, IU Department of Gender Studies, Fatness Fiction, and Big Car Collaborative

Tube Factory Artspace—1125 Cruft St.

 What does it mean to fit in? How do we do so when who we are conflicts with the community in which we live? When—why—do we decide that trying to fit in (or not) helps us grow spiritually? In this series of three conversations, you are invited to explore how friction points that exist in personal and community (r)evolution can help us grow spiritually has human beings.

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Tuesday, November 5, 6—8 p.m.

 A Tailored Fit: Three Conversations on Fitting In featuring Dr. Brenda Weber (#2)

Presented by the IU Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies, IU Department of Gender Studies, Fatness Fiction, and Big Car Collaborative

Tube Factory Artspace—1125 Cruft St.

What does it mean to fit in? How do we do so when who we are conflicts with the community in which we live? When—why—do we decide that trying to fit in (or not) helps us grow spiritually? In this series of three conversations, you are invited to explore how friction points that exist in personal and community (r)evolution can help us grow spiritually has human beings.

_______________________________________________

Wednesday, November 6, 5:30—8:00 p.m.

 Stuck

Presented by the Indianapolis Film Project, Spades Park Branch Library, Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library, Big Car Collaborative, and Bluebeard Restaurant

Spades Park Library—1801 Nowland Ave.

 An evening of conversation and film. Join local authors and artists to discuss how evolving threats and fears of the “other” affect art, culture, and community and watch the 1956 film “Storm Center” starring Bette Davis. Food by Bluebeard!

___________________________________________________

 Wednesday, November 6, 6—8 p.m.

 A Tailored Fit: Three Conversations on Fitting In featuring Ellise Antoinette Smith (#3)

Presented by the IU Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies, IU Department of Gender Studies, Fatness Fiction, and Big Car Collaborative

Tube Factory Artspace—1125 Cruft St.

What does it mean to fit in? How do we do so when who we are conflicts with the community in which we live? When—why—do we decide that trying to fit in (or not) helps us grow spiritually? In this series of three conversations, you are invited to explore how friction points that exist in personal and community (r)evolution can help us grow spiritually has human beings. 

___________________________________________________

 Wednesday, November 6, 6:30—8:00 p.m.

 God(s) & Aliens: A Conversation on Faith, Science, and E.T.

Presented by IUPUI Department of Earth Sciences, IUPUI Center for the Study of Religion & American Culture, IUPUI Senior Academy, Earth Charter Indiana, Hoosier Environmental Council, Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation, All Souls Unitarian Church, and Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library

Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation Chapel—6501 N. Meridian St.

Join Dr. Gabriel Filippelli (IUPUI Earth Sciences), Dr. Philip Goff (Center for the Study of Religion & American Culture), Rabbi Scott Fox (Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation), and Reverend Anastassia Zinke (All Souls Unitarian Church) in a conversation moderated by Jill Sheridan (WFYI) as they explore matters of science, faith, and the history of American thought. Facilitated small group conversations will give attendees the chance to deeply explore what it means when fact and faith collide.

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 Thursday, November 7, 4:30—6:00 p.m.

Seen & Heard: Cultural Organizations and the LGBTQ Experience

Presented by IUPUI Museum Studies Program, IUPUI Public History Program, and Indiana Historical Society

Eugene and Marilyn Glock Indiana History Center—450 W. Ohio St.

 Panel discussion exploring national and local initiatives to archive, preserve, and interpret LGBTQ history and culture, as well as evolving practices to involve and include LGBTQ communities.

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 Thursday, November 7, 6:00—8:30 p.m.

 Ain’t I a Woman? The Evolution of Women in Politics

Presented by The Indianapolis Propylaeum, Central Indiana Community Foundation, Indiana Historical Society, Indiana Humanities, Indiana Latino Institute, Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council, Indianapolis Women’s Chorus, League of Women Voters of Indianapolis, Muslim Alliance of Indiana, Peace Learning Center, The Exchange, and Women4Change Indiana

The Indianapolis Propylaeum—1410 N. Delaware St.

Cost: $20/$10 Students

Come to the table! Through conversation over dinner we will explore the incomplete legacy of the women’s suffrage movement in an effort to build bridges, see new perspectives, and find a path forward.

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 Friday, November 8, 6—8 p.m. 

 C.H.A.T. Culture, Heart, Art, & Talk!

Presented by CAGI – Community Action of Greater Indianapolis, Ryan L. Bennett, and The Reset Center

The Reset Center—4330 N. Post Rd.

Creating a safe space to witness transformative art and discuss issues of the heart in pursuit of social justice and equality for ALL. Join Artist-led group discussions to target solutions to chronic violence and health disparities plaguing our community. 

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 Sunday, November 10, 12– 2 p.m.

 Is it Revolution or Evolution?

Presented by Hindu Temple of Central Indiana, Geeta Mandal, and Hindu American Vanaprasthi Network

Hindu Temple of Central Indiana—3350 N. German Church Rd.

Immigrants to the United States bring their religion, art, and culture with them, but connections to these things change over time. You are invited to listen in as Hindu youth and elders discuss and debate the evolution of their culture in America.

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Sunday, November 10, 1:00– 3:30 p.m.

 Spirituality at the Intersections: A Conversation featuring Dr. Maria Hamilton Abegunde, Fr. Richard Rohr, Teresa Mateus, and Ven. Lobzang Dorje

Presented by Purdue University Black Cultural Center, Center for Black Literature & Culture, Peace Learning Center, and Rokh

IUPUI Campus Center Theater—420 University Blvd.

 Engage in this cross-faith dialogue exploring the bridges between spirituality, faith, justice, and wellness featuring Fr. Richard Rohr (via video conference) from the Center for Action & Contemplation, ancestral priest Dr. Maria Hamilton Abegunde, and Teresa Mateus of Mystic Soul. A reception precedes the event and closes with a “sound bath.”

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 Sunday, November 10, 4:30– 6:00 p.m.

 24th Annual Public Conversation
Presented by Spirt & Place, Butler Arts Center, IUPUI Africana Studies Program, and Indiana University Bloomington Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies.

Shelton Auditorium—1000 W 42nd St.

Nikole Hannah-Jones is an award-winning investigative reporter covering racial injustice for The New York Times Magazine. A 2016 Peabody Award winner for her series on school segregation for “This American Life” and 2017 MacArthur Fellow, Hannah-Jones was most recently the lead journalist for The 1619 Project.

 Join us–Civic Saturday style–as we use history, poetry, and music to anchor a conversation about why it is time to revolutionize the way we talk about our past. About how it is a moral imperative we re-frame conversations on history, society, and race in order to address systemic injustices. America’s traditional origin stories don’t work for everyone and now is the time to wrestle with the meaning of who we are and who we want to be in order to bring America closer to its promises.